Dr. Serban Danielescu : Linkages between agricultural... (23-02-2017)

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Dr. Serban Danielescu (ECCC AAFC)

Linkages between agricultural practices and the quality of groundwater and potential impacts on downgradient aquatic ecosystems

Jeudi 23 février 2017 à 13h30/ Thursday, February 23, 2017, 1:30pm

Local PK-7605, 201 ave. Président-Kennedy, UQAM

Résumé / Abstract:

Serban Danielescu, Ph.D.
Research Scientist, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Fredericton, NB, serban.danielescu@canada.ca ; (506) 460-4468

In Atlantic Canada, the collaboration between ECCC and AAFC in the area of groundwater research has been focused on understanding the impacts of the agricultural production systems on the quality of water and consequent impacts on downgradient ecosystems, topics relevant for the mandates of both departments. The joint research activities take place in areas dominated by intensive agricultural practices, such as the Saint John River Watershed (e.g. New Brunswick potato belt) as well as in core potato production areas in Prince Edward Island. The research program led by Dr. Danielescu, focused on nutrient (i.e. nitrogen) fate and transport in the subsurface, involves a combination of conventional groundwater field investigation methods, used in conjunction with numerical modelling, geophysical tools, natural and artificial tracers, aimed at developing an integrated ecosystem-based perspective on the transfer of water and contaminants the surface of the ground to receiving surface water bodies (e.g. streams, lakes, estuaries) at various spatial and temporal scales. Throughout the presentation a series of recent research outputs will be introduced to the audience. Several of these examples include hydrogeological field methods, baseflow separation using digital filters and geochemical tracers, use of stable isotopes (water, nitrate), numerical modelling of tracer plumes, particle tracking, groundwater nitrogen loading at field and watershed scales.